Three Groups Most Likely to be Deported(New Immigration Policy)

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Three Group Most likely to be Deported: A change in immigration policy announced by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will affect 11 million people who are in the US without documents (sometimes called illegal immigrants). DHS will focus on deporting the following three groups of undocumented immigrants.

1. Convicted Criminals

2. Terrorist Suspects

3. Those who have recently crossed the US border (Since January 2014)

For more information on this change in enforcement policy see Who will be deported? 

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While not being deported does not lead to getting a green card, or any other immigration benefit, it may provide some peace of mind for those who do not fall within the above groups.

There is one one group who may file an immigration application. Those who qualify for Two-year DACA, may file for temporary relief from deportation and permission to work in the US. For information on who may apply for DACA now see Two-Year DACA

H-4 spouses of H-1B workers and Work Authorization

Good news for H-4 spouses of some H-1B workers. If you are in H-4 status and your spouse either has an approved I-140, or if your spouse is permitted to renew H-1B status in three-yer increments beyond the six-year limit, you may file an application for permission to work in the US beginning May 26, 2015. H-4 work permission For answers to frequently asked questions click on FAQ’s.

Employment for Husband or Wife of Some H-1B Workers


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Some husbands or wives of H-1B workers may file an application for permission to work in the US beginning May 26, 2015.

Who can apply?

  1. Must be in H-4 status and be married to an H-1B worker, and
  2. H-1B husband or wife must fit into one of the following groups:
    1. The H-1b worker has an approved I-140, but must wait to apply for a green card until an immigrant visa (green card) becomes available based on the Visa Bulletin (H-1B can file application for extension of status in three-year increments until he or she can apply for a green card, or
    2. H-1B  spouse can file application for extension of status in one-year increments because either a Labor Certification or an I-140 was filed for him or her before the end of the 5th year in H-1B status.

A husband or wife of an H-1B worker who meets the above requirements may file an Application for Employment Authorization on Form I-765 beginning May 26, 2015 with supporting evidence and a $380 filing fee.

What supporting Evidence is Required?

  1. Marriage certificate showing marriage to current H-1B husband or wife
    1. Evidence that shows H-1B husband or wife meets the above requirements for filing an application for extension of H-1B status beyond 6 years
  2. Entry Documents from Most Recent Entry to US
    1. I-94, either card (front and back) or printout
  3. Copy of most recent EAD
  4. If H-4 has never received an EAD, submit copy of government-issued identity document showing picture, name and date of birth, such as,
    1. Passport
    2. Birth certificate with a photo ID
  • Visa issued by foreign consulate, or
  1. -National identity document
  2. Two identical color photographs of yourself, taken within 30 days of filing your application

Warning!! No H-4 EAD applications will be accepted before May 26, 2015. Do not pay anyone to file an EAD application for you before that date.

 

 

 

 

H-4 Employment

Deferred Action for Children (DACA) – February 18th

 

DREAM Act

USCIS will begin accepting deferred action  immigration applications for children (DACA) who arrived in the US before their 16th birthday using the new, expanded requirements on February 18, 2015. This program provides temporary relief from deportation.  It allows those whose applications are granted to apply for permission to work legally in the US.

 

Requirements for Expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

1.  Arrived in US before 16th birthday

2. Continuously lived in US from June 1, 2010 to present

3. Physically present in US on June 15, 2012

4. Entered US without inspection (sometimes called illegally) before June 15, 2012, or any lawful immigration status ended on or before June 15, 2012.

5. Applicant must be age 15 or older

6. Education Requirements: Currrently in School, or graduated from high school, or GED, or honorably discharged from military

7. No convictions for felony, significant misdemeanor, three or more misdemeanors, and not a threat to national security or public safety

For information on how to avoid scams see Avoid Scams.